Laptops misused for gaming - how long can they last?

Coffeecup132
542 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Member
edited June 2017
We know there is no such thing as a 'gaming laptop', but there are laptops which are misused for gaming - and this post/questions below are about these misused laptops.
Making laptops play games = bad decision is already known (no lectures needed) - but this is about asking how to make these 'misused for games' machines last as long as anyone can.
(I'm always traveling and almost never at home -> desktops not my option)

Reasons for asking:
I only buy laptops for work - but always can't help the curiosity of trying to see how much I can push them for games. My old Dell work laptop (Intel Core2Duo with a crappy Intel GMA X3100 graphics chipset) was forced to run games it was struggling to handle (e.g. CS Source, COD4MW), runs very hot...

...but it has lasted me 9 years and is still working running BF2.

While my later HP work laptop (AMD A-8, 8Gb RAM, HD7640G shared RAM GPU) started gradually having more BSODs only after 2 years, and finally became a brick after 4 years (despite various lengthy detailed discussions on tech forums trying to save it) - I tested BF4 on it -> on low with 25-50 fps - it gave about 130 hours of BF4 (I still had fun!), plus at least 1500 hours of 30 plus other games of varying requirements. While gaming it runs hot (up to 99 degrees Celcius) and doubles as a grill for my burgers.

No surprises the HP died after 4 years, but wished it lasted as the older/crappier but equally abused 9 year old Dell.

NOW - I wouldn't want my new humble laptop [Intel i5, 8GB, GTX 1050 (4GB GDDR5), 1TB hard drive with 8Gb cache] crap out after only 2-4 years. Since I can't help playing BF4 and other games as well on it, now I am worried that I will fry it to its premature death like the previous HP, hence myself wanting to research about this among the Battlefield forums participants:

Questions:
1) For those who have misused laptops for gaming - how long have these laptops lasted so far [Make,some specs and game(s) played would be helpful].

2) What advice do anyone have to prolong the life of these misused laptops, especially if you can't bring yourself to stop playing games on them?

3) I tried to keep all my games including BF4 to run at least 90fps or more, and also try to make sure GPU temperatures don't exceed 65 degrees Celsius (for the logic that if it can maintain those framerates while not being too hot, the laptop is not being overburdened and won't die too soon. Is this a right rationale to have?
Post edited by Coffeecup132 on

Comments

  • OprahSpreadEagle
    442 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Hardline, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE Member
    Two things I would like to point out
    1) Laptops are designed with a pretty short service life. The usual life expectancy is around 3 years, so you have been very fortunate with keeping yours so long. Sure there are exceptions but most die after a few years.
    2) I have owned regular laptops and "gaming" laptops and one thing kills them both is HEAT. The regular laptops all lasted 3+ years while the gaming laptop died after less than 2 years. I think that the primary reason for that is that the gaming laptop was hot as a firecracker when it was rest. I never even gamed on it and it was hot no matter what. So by design gaming laptops are not meant to last very long due to heat. Again I know there are exceptions but in general this is how it goes.
    I wish I had better news for you. Good Luck
  • Gforce81
    3666 postsMember, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    I bought an ASUS when I graduated from HS that was for "college"; it was a total coincidence that it read "republic of gamers" on it lol.

    Like ^ said, heat was an issue most of the time. You may do this already, but perhaps getting a good quality USB laptop fan would be helpful to keep the heat levels down.

    I also ran any games I would play on it, on minimum graphic settings. Seemed to help keep it from getting way too warm.

    I don't do anything serious on it anymore, but it still works to this day. Now 7 years old.

    I played MW3, Borderlands, Killing Floor, Red Orchestra 2, Skyrim, plus a bunch others that I may not be remembering correctly
  • Coffeecup132
    542 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Member
    edited June 2017
    Thanks guys for your valuable input!

    I have even read about how a similar make/model's outcomes are so different between different users - I guess there is the added factor of even for the best long lasting tried & tested laptops, there will be a few which are bad luck turkeys off the production line.
    ... the gaming laptop was hot as a firecracker when it was rest. I never even gamed on it and it was hot no matter what...
    That was my what my fried HP (RIP) was like - it was in the 80s-90s Celcius most of the time no matter what - now I count my blessings that it still lasted 4 years (last 2 years BSOD ridden).

    Gforce81 wrote: »
    Like ^ said, heat was an issue most of the time. You may do this already, but perhaps getting a good quality USB laptop fan would be helpful to keep the heat levels down.

    I also ran any games I would play on it, on minimum graphic settings. Seemed to help keep it from getting way too warm.
    Yeah, I use a laptop cooler plus also further propping it up with bottle caps for added airflow underneath. I also run games with most things on low (with the occasional medium-high, but never ultra) - and BF4 even with this settings at 720p still looks brilliant (to me, difference compared to 1080p won't be noticed much on a 15.6" screen and with all the fast movements in-game).

    BF4 temperature without cooler:
    GPU 62C
    CPU 53C

    BF4 temperature with cooling pad and propped up:
    GPU 57C
    CPU 50C

    Video settings set modestly to get frame rates averaging at 100fps in order to ensure laptop is not working too hard.
    Gforce81 wrote: »
    I bought an ASUS when I graduated from HS that was for "college"; it was a total coincidence that it read "republic of gamers" on it lol....I don't do anything serious on it anymore, but it still works to this day. Now 7 years old.

    I played MW3, Borderlands, Killing Floor, Red Orchestra 2, Skyrim, plus a bunch others that I may not be remembering correctly

    LOL :# - 'total coincidence' of it being in the ROG series...and for 'college' work as well!. Damn, those pesky Microsoft Word documents surely need discrete graphic chipsets eh :#

    You're one of the lucky ones getting yours lasting up to 7 years - credits to your taking care not to strain it too much I suppose. While my mate's Lenovo burned out after just over a year :/

    I wish most games would be well optimized for PC like MW3 and BO2 - these looks decent enough for an FPS and can run smooth on laptops without discrete graphics card

  • Gforce81
    3666 postsMember, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    edited June 2017
    Thanks guys for your valuable input!

    I have even read about how a similar make/model's outcomes are so different between different users - I guess there is the added factor of even for the best long lasting tried & tested laptops, there will be a few which are bad luck turkeys off the production line.
    ... the gaming laptop was hot as a firecracker when it was rest. I never even gamed on it and it was hot no matter what...
    That was my what my fried HP (RIP) was like - it was in the 80s-90s Celcius most of the time no matter what - now I count my blessings that it still lasted 4 years (last 2 years BSOD ridden).

    Gforce81 wrote: »
    Like ^ said, heat was an issue most of the time. You may do this already, but perhaps getting a good quality USB laptop fan would be helpful to keep the heat levels down.

    I also ran any games I would play on it, on minimum graphic settings. Seemed to help keep it from getting way too warm.
    Yeah, I use a laptop cooler plus also further propping it up with bottle caps for added airflow underneath. I also run games with most things on low (with the occasional medium-high, but never ultra) - and BF4 even with this settings at 720p still looks brilliant (to me, difference compared to 1080p won't be noticed much on a 15.6" screen and with all the fast movements in-game).

    BF4 temperature without cooler:
    GPU 62C
    CPU 53C

    BF4 temperature with cooling pad and propped up:
    GPU 57C
    CPU 50C

    Video settings set modestly to get frame rates averaging at 100fps in order to ensure laptop is not working too hard.
    Gforce81 wrote: »
    I bought an ASUS when I graduated from HS that was for "college"; it was a total coincidence that it read "republic of gamers" on it lol....I don't do anything serious on it anymore, but it still works to this day. Now 7 years old.

    I played MW3, Borderlands, Killing Floor, Red Orchestra 2, Skyrim, plus a bunch others that I may not be remembering correctly

    LOL :# - 'total coincidence' of it being in the ROG series...and for 'college' work as well!. Damn, those pesky Microsoft Word documents surely need discrete graphic chipsets eh :#

    You're one of the lucky ones getting yours lasting up to 7 years - credits to your taking care not to strain it too much I suppose. While my mate's Lenovo burned out after just over a year :/

    I wish most games would be well optimized for PC like MW3 and BO2 - these looks decent enough for an FPS and can run smooth on laptops without discrete graphics card

    Yeah, having a pretty decent on-board graphics card was pretty useful too, I doubt I would have been able to get as much done without it.

    I noticed it was starting to get bogged down at one point, so I took it apart and blew out the dust out of the internal fan; made a HUGE difference right off the bat.

    This is kinda ghetto, but for nearly a year, I had the USB fan, but ALSO a little desktop fan that I kept right next the heat-exhaust (it was on the L edge of the laptop for me) and had the fan blowing into the exhaust all the time; a little extra boost of air movement to cool it down. It was a little noisy, but I played with headphones, so it was no big deal

    I'm not a huge techie, I'm sure there are more software things I could have done to optimize its performance, but I don't have the patience to play trial and error with various settings for hours. One of the downsides to PC gaming I guess; gotta continually keep your rig up to snuff as far as updates, drivers, what is compatible with what game software, etc.

    And of course games don't make it any easier; each time a new one releases its like a contest to see who can make the biggest, most drastic/taxing jump in graphics. My poor laptop can't keep up with the constant upgrading lol
  • Toxic_CA
    797 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    Psh you call your desktop trick ghetto? I had a literal fan, normal sized fan leaning off my bed blowing into my laptop. That laptop is like 6 to 8 years old and literally falling apart and it's still running
  • Coffeecup132
    542 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Member
    edited June 2017
    Gforce81 wrote: »
    Yeah, having a pretty decent on-board graphics card was pretty useful too, I doubt I would have been able to get as much done without it.

    I noticed it was starting to get bogged down at one point, so I took it apart and blew out the dust out of the internal fan; made a HUGE difference right off the bat.

    This is kinda ghetto, but for nearly a year, I had the USB fan, but ALSO a little desktop fan that I kept right next the heat-exhaust (it was on the L edge of the laptop for me) and had the fan blowing into the exhaust all the time; a little extra boost of air movement to cool it down. It was a little noisy, but I played with headphones, so it was no big deal

    I'm not a huge techie, I'm sure there are more software things I could have done to optimize its performance, but I don't have the patience to play trial and error with various settings for hours. One of the downsides to PC gaming I guess; gotta continually keep your rig up to snuff as far as updates, drivers, what is compatible with what game software, etc.

    And of course games don't make it any easier; each time a new one releases its like a contest to see who can make the biggest, most drastic/taxing jump in graphics. My poor laptop can't keep up with the constant upgrading lol

    I am relieved that for this current laptop, it wouldn't be too difficult for me to clean the fans at least:

    dell-inspiron-15-7000-inside.jpg

    And I will learn how to get comfortable with re-applying thermal paste if the need arises.
    Another factor which I hope will make this laptop relevant for me for a longer period is that the latest games that I have are from 2013/2014 (BF4, Ghosts...) and I have no interest whatsoever in getting any newer games post 2013. So far games that I acquire tend to be going backwards in time.
    Toxic_CA wrote: »
    Psh you call your desktop trick ghetto? I had a literal fan, normal sized fan leaning off my bed blowing into my laptop. That laptop is like 6 to 8 years old and literally falling apart and it's still running

    If your method is ghetto, than mine is straight outta East Harlem bruh:

    Cool_cooler_edit.jpg

    This is not a joke - that is the picture of my previous HP (now fried) with the whole freakin air conditioner as the cooler. That was the only way I could get through Windows 10 clean install without it crashing midway due to overheating.

    So glad I don't have to do that anymore


    Post edited by Coffeecup132 on
  • MUH_Cwywardwaah
    1083 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha Member
    edited June 2017

    Video settings set modestly to get frame rates averaging at 100fps in order to ensure laptop is not working too hard.

    High fps also increases heat btw. So the laptop is still working hard. Lock the refresh rate to 60.
  • crabman169
    12841 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Hardline, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, Battlefield V Member
    My Dell Studio is 8 years old, battery needs charger plugged it at all times and i use egg cartons to keep it from overheating

    I honesty can't give any feedback other then my personal experiance
  • Coffeecup132
    542 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Member
    Seems if you're lucky to have a DELL which lasts, it really lasts - all my DELLs are still working (including the 9-year old one)
  • Coffeecup132
    542 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Member

    Video settings set modestly to get frame rates averaging at 100fps in order to ensure laptop is not working too hard.

    High fps also increases heat btw. So the laptop is still working hard. Lock the refresh rate to 60.

    Great suggestion! Is this through VSync?
    Switched on VSync - somehow my Source engine games suffers from mouse input lag
  • crabman169
    12841 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Hardline, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, Battlefield V Member
    Seems if you're lucky to have a DELL which lasts, it really lasts - all my DELLs are still working (including the 9-year old one)

    Yeah I'm a Dell man; not really fond of other brands expect maybe Toshiba mainly because you can get spare parts etc locally

    My first laptop would be the only Dell we have that don't still work; I fried the motherboard from excessive usage
  • MUH_Cwywardwaah
    1083 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha Member

    Video settings set modestly to get frame rates averaging at 100fps in order to ensure laptop is not working too hard.

    High fps also increases heat btw. So the laptop is still working hard. Lock the refresh rate to 60.

    Great suggestion! Is this through VSync?
    Switched on VSync - somehow my Source engine games suffers from mouse input lag

    With the nvidia control panel. Vsync is terrible and you just found out why lol. Or if the game has an in game fps lock (not Vsync) then you can use that.
  • Coffeecup132
    542 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Member
    edited June 2017

    Video settings set modestly to get frame rates averaging at 100fps in order to ensure laptop is not working too hard.

    High fps also increases heat btw. So the laptop is still working hard. Lock the refresh rate to 60.

    Great suggestion! Is this through VSync?
    Switched on VSync - somehow my Source engine games suffers from mouse input lag

    With the nvidia control panel. Vsync is terrible and you just found out why lol. Or if the game has an in game fps lock (not Vsync) then you can use that.

    Having trouble looking for the relevant setting in NVidia control panel.
    Manage 3d settings -> Program settings -> ?
    The closest setting to capping the frame rates would be VSync settings in the Nvidia control panel, which I suppose is not the one I should use?

    Edit: I figured out the individual ways to cap frame rates for each game I have installed - tedious but done it.
    COD games tends to already be capped at 91fps anyway, which I think is not that far from 60fps - hopefully that is significant enough to lessen load on the GPU
    Post edited by Coffeecup132 on
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