Guide on how to correctly configure G-sync

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Dragam
879 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
edited December 2018
I've noticed that alot of people are using g-sync incorrectly (aka default settings), which will result in drastically increased input lag - correctly configured, g-sync has the equivelant input lag of v-sync off (which is the fastest method available).

What you need to do to configure it correctly :

1. Download Msi Afterburner, which includes Rivatuner.

2. Enable g-sync for fullscreen in nvidia control panel.

3. Force v-sync on in global settings in nvidia control panel.

4. Use rivatuner to limit your fps 3 below the hz of your monitor. So if you got a 144 hz monitor, limit the fps to 141.

5. Disable v-sync in the game settings.

Mouse input lag should now be 2 to 3 times less compared to g-sync at stock settings.

https://www.blurbusters.com/gsync/gsync101-input-lag-tests-and-settings/14/

An alternative to using rivatuner to limit the fps, is making a user.cfg file with notepad, where you use the command GameTime.MaxVariableFps to limit the fps. This will give you slightly less input lag than using rivatuner, but at the cost of much more uneven frametimes, making the game feel more stuttery, thus i personally find it preferable to use rivatuner.
Post edited by Dragam on

Comments

  • TapperSweden
    202 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    edited December 2018
    But shouldent v-sync be ON in game and OFF in nvidia panel? .... Just kidding :-) . I cant belive there are people that still giving the wrong advices when g-sync has been around for so long.
    Nice work with a guide and from what i have seen its still much needed .
  • VonReisler
    572 postsMember, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    gstink, what a typical Nvidia scumbag scam to leverage more money out of gamers, it won't even exist in another couple of years and I bet it won't be backwards supported either.
  • Dragam
    879 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    But shouldent v-sync be ON in game and OFF in nvidia panel? .... Just kidding :-) . I cant belive there are people that still giving the wrong advices when g-sync has been around for so long.
    Nice work with a guide and from what i have seen its still much needed .

    Yeah, alot of people are using incorrect settings, and then people giving even more incorrect advice about said settings.

    That said, it is odd that nvidia couldn't just configure it for the best result out of the box when you enable it. Out of the box, it gives nearly as bad input lag as normal v-sync on.
  • ballFetcher
    122 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, BF1IncursionsAlpha, Battlefield V Member
    edited December 2018
    Hi, trying to help my brother. He has 40 fps on Ultra and i have 90-100 fps (exact same machine/OS build though he has 64 Gb Ram vs my 32 and better CPU - go figure). Probably not related to Gsync but still worth a try. My question is, why use that specific order? I did it in this order:

    1) Gsync on in nvidia settings for fullscreen
    2) RivaTuner -3 FPS on 144
    3) Install BF/Update BF
    4) Once on first install turn off v-sync in BF settings. Have not changed anything in Nvidia global settings.

    Don't think i have input lag (though i suck at BF so possible). So why is it is necessary to turn ON v-sync in global nvidia settings?? Sort of weird :-)

    " 3. Force v-sync on in global settings in nvidia control panel."

    Thanks
  • OskooI_007
    1273 postsMember, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    Limiting framerate with Rivatuner adds 1 frame of input lag. It's better to limit framerate using the in-game framerate limiter, which is the console command GameTime.MaxVariableFps for Battlefield.

    blur-busters-gsync-101-gsync-ingame-vs-rtss.png
    Yes, RTSS still introduces up to 1 frame of delay, regardless of the syncing method, or lack thereof, used.

    G-SYNC 101: In-game vs. External FPS Limiters

    As for forcing v-sync in the Nvidia control panel, it shouldn't matter because the framerate limiter prevents vsync from engaging. But if for some reason the framerate goes over the limiter, then you'll get an addition 1-2 frames of input lag depending on if double or triple buffered vsync is used. Battlefield uses triple buffered vsync by default.

    So if you want the absolute lowest input lag.

    - use the in-game fps limiter 'GameTime.MaxVariableFps'
    - disable vsync in the in-game settings
    - leave Nvidia control panel's vsync setting to the default of "Application Controlled"
  • TapperSweden
    202 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    Hi, trying to help my brother. He has 40 fps on Ultra and i have 90-100 fps (exact same machine/OS build though he has 64 Gb Ram vs my 32 and better CPU - go figure). Probably not related to Gsync but still worth a try. My question is, why use that specific order? I did it in this order:

    1) Gsync on in nvidia settings for fullscreen
    2) RivaTuner -3 FPS on 144
    3) Install BF/Update BF
    4) Once on first install turn off v-sync in BF settings. Have not changed anything in Nvidia global settings.

    Don't think i have input lag (though i suck at BF so possible). So why is it is necessary to turn ON v-sync in global nvidia settings?? Sort of weird :-)

    " 3. Force v-sync on in global settings in nvidia control panel."

    Thanks

    Because from what i have seen on nvidia forums G-sync is using some feuture of V-sync to work correctly, thats why there's so much confusing advices regarding G-sync. Put it up like this guide the order does not matter. If your monitor is faster then the fps you get in game you dont need to limit the fps, if it does limit the fps within the game, you can use rivaturner if no limiter is present in a game but it ads a bit of input lag.
  • enterBrainer
    138 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Hardline, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, Battlefield V Member
    Hi, trying to help my brother. He has 40 fps on Ultra and i have 90-100 fps (exact same machine/OS build though he has 64 Gb Ram vs my 32 and better CPU - go figure). Probably not related to Gsync but still worth a try. My question is, why use that specific order? I did it in this order:

    1) Gsync on in nvidia settings for fullscreen
    2) RivaTuner -3 FPS on 144
    3) Install BF/Update BF
    4) Once on first install turn off v-sync in BF settings. Have not changed anything in Nvidia global settings.

    Don't think i have input lag (though i suck at BF so possible). So why is it is necessary to turn ON v-sync in global nvidia settings?? Sort of weird :-)

    " 3. Force v-sync on in global settings in nvidia control panel."

    Thanks

    Go check out the Energy Scheme in Control Panel and put it at High Performance.
  • fartyfarmer
    16 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    From elsewhere on the web "Not entirely correct. V-sync attempts to sync your monitor's graphics card with the current refresh rate of the monitor. This means it would try to update the frame every 0.00694 seconds, or 7 ms, instead of when the graphics card is finished rendering. This causes input lag, and if you're running much lower than the monitor's refresh rate, stuttering.

    If you are using a GeForce card with G-SYNC it literally makes V-Sync pointless, there's no reason to have it on so long as you're using G-Sync, as G-Sync does V-sync's job but better. It makes the panel update *as soon* as the card has a new frame, not when the monitor refreshes. This eliminates screen tearing entirely, which is the only reason V-Sync exists, and (most of the time) stuttering.

    You want VSYNC set to OFF if you are going to be using GSync, period. There's no reason to use both at the same time.

    Also, G-Sync already FPS caps you at 144 FPS anyway, and your eyes won't see the difference between 144 FPS and 200 FPS because your monitor can't refresh that fast anyway."

    You want VSYNC set to OFF if you are going to be using GSync, period. There's no reason to use both at the same time.
  • jah_volunteer
    2 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    edited December 2018
    I'm a little confused. With a 144hz GSync monitor, assuming I turn V-SYnc off in game, do I still need to limit the frames to 141?
  • TapperSweden
    202 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    From elsewhere on the web "Not entirely correct. V-sync attempts to sync your monitor's graphics card with the current refresh rate of the monitor. This means it would try to update the frame every 0.00694 seconds, or 7 ms, instead of when the graphics card is finished rendering. This causes input lag, and if you're running much lower than the monitor's refresh rate, stuttering.

    If you are using a GeForce card with G-SYNC it literally makes V-Sync pointless, there's no reason to have it on so long as you're using G-Sync, as G-Sync does V-sync's job but better. It makes the panel update *as soon* as the card has a new frame, not when the monitor refreshes. This eliminates screen tearing entirely, which is the only reason V-Sync exists, and (most of the time) stuttering.

    You want VSYNC set to OFF if you are going to be using GSync, period. There's no reason to use both at the same time.

    Also, G-Sync already FPS caps you at 144 FPS anyway, and your eyes won't see the difference between 144 FPS and 200 FPS because your monitor can't refresh that fast anyway."

    You want VSYNC set to OFF if you are going to be using GSync, period. There's no reason to use both at the same time.

    Educate yourself before advising people because they might folow your advices.

    - V-Sync, speaking in terms of G-Sync, is no longer the V-Sync of the past, it now works in tandem with G-Sync and should be turned on in NCP (Control Panel) no matter what! "Preferred Refresh Rate" should be set to highest available as well.

    2 - V-Sync should be turned off in all in-game settings

    Source :
    https://www.google.se/amp/s/amp.reddit.com/r/nvidia/comments/8pztyj/how_to_use_gsync_properly/
  • Dragam
    879 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    From elsewhere on the web "Not entirely correct. V-sync attempts to sync your monitor's graphics card with the current refresh rate of the monitor. This means it would try to update the frame every 0.00694 seconds, or 7 ms, instead of when the graphics card is finished rendering. This causes input lag, and if you're running much lower than the monitor's refresh rate, stuttering.

    If you are using a GeForce card with G-SYNC it literally makes V-Sync pointless, there's no reason to have it on so long as you're using G-Sync, as G-Sync does V-sync's job but better. It makes the panel update *as soon* as the card has a new frame, not when the monitor refreshes. This eliminates screen tearing entirely, which is the only reason V-Sync exists, and (most of the time) stuttering.

    You want VSYNC set to OFF if you are going to be using GSync, period. There's no reason to use both at the same time.

    Also, G-Sync already FPS caps you at 144 FPS anyway, and your eyes won't see the difference between 144 FPS and 200 FPS because your monitor can't refresh that fast anyway."

    You want VSYNC set to OFF if you are going to be using GSync, period. There's no reason to use both at the same time.

    Incorrect. If v-sync is not forced in nvcp, then you will still get tearing.

    Read the article i linked to.
  • TapperSweden
    202 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    And what cap are you talking about? I play at more then 200 fps with g sync ON
  • Dead_Iawn
    5 postsMember, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, Battlefield V Member
    hey sorry I'm new to pc gaming.. I have a 144hz monitor. I get around 100 frames in game at 1440p. do I even need to worry about gsync as I'm getting lower frames then the monitor? I do have a gsync monitor BTW
  • jasonvp
    189 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Hardline, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha, Battlefield V Member
    Also, G-Sync already FPS caps you at 144 FPS anyway,

    Your post is full of all sorts of misinformation, but this is the one that sticks out to me the most. GSync does nothing, at all, to prevent your frame rate from exceeding your display's maximum refresh rate. Nothing. Zip. Zero. Zilch. If your GPU can push 500FPS, it'll do it with or without GSync (not VSync) enabled. The only thing GSync does (and does so, wonderfully) is sync your GPU and display up when the GPU can't hit the display's max refresh rate.

    For example, with GSync on:
    • If your display's max is 144Hz and the GPU can push 400, you'll get: 400FPS on a 144Hz screen
    • If your display's max is 144Hz and the GPU can only push 100, you'll get: 100FPS on a 100Hz screen

    This is why it's recommended to soft-cap your games to a few FPS under the display's max refresh. Ideally: use the game's built-in limiter; failing that, use something like RTSS or Playclaw to do it. Don't limit at the display's max, do so a few frames under. It forces the panel to stay in its GSync sweet spot.

  • OskooI_007
    1273 postsMember, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    Gsync doesn't cap frame rates. Screen tearing will only happen if the fps limit is exceeded.
  • Dragam
    879 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    edited December 2018
    OskooI_007 wrote: »
    Limiting framerate with Rivatuner adds 1 frame of input lag. It's better to limit framerate using the in-game framerate limiter, which is the console command GameTime.MaxVariableFps for Battlefield.

    blur-busters-gsync-101-gsync-ingame-vs-rtss.png
    Yes, RTSS still introduces up to 1 frame of delay, regardless of the syncing method, or lack thereof, used.

    G-SYNC 101: In-game vs. External FPS Limiters

    As for forcing v-sync in the Nvidia control panel, it shouldn't matter because the framerate limiter prevents vsync from engaging. But if for some reason the framerate goes over the limiter, then you'll get an addition 1-2 frames of input lag depending on if double or triple buffered vsync is used. Battlefield uses triple buffered vsync by default.

    So if you want the absolute lowest input lag.

    - use the in-game fps limiter 'GameTime.MaxVariableFps'
    - disable vsync in the in-game settings
    - leave Nvidia control panel's vsync setting to the default of "Application Controlled"

    You are correct in regards to this game, that you can use the console to cap your fps at whatever you please. However most games don't support this, and using rivatuner is a nice simple universal solution, which still has drastically less input lag than the stock g-sync settings.

    You are incorrect about the necessity to force v-sync on in the nvidia control panel - if it is neither activated in the control panel nor the game, you will get tearing, as g-sync is still dependant on the v-sync setting. So it absolutely is necessary to have v-sync on with g-sync, and it is preferable to use it through the driver rather than the game.
    As for any additional input lag due to forcing v-sync on in nvcp, that won't happen as long as you cap your fps 3 below your hz.
  • jasonvp
    189 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Hardline, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha, Battlefield V Member
    Dragam wrote: »
    You are correct in regards to this game, that you can use the console to cap your fps at whatever you please. However most games don't support this, and using rivatuner is a nice simple universal solution, which still has drastically less input lag than the stock g-sync settings.

    The compromise I've used since starting with GSync on the original PG278Q panel:
    1. Set the in-game to 140 if the game supports it
    2. Set the external cap (RTSS, Playclaw) to 141

    That catches everything.

  • OskooI_007
    1273 postsMember, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    edited December 2018
    You will only get tearing if the framerate goes above gsync's refresh rate. The whole point of gsync is to eliminate the need for vsync.

    The only thing enabling vsync in Nvidia control panel does is provide a safety net against tearing if the framerate exceeds gsync's refresh rate. Otherwise vsync never engages and does absolutely nothing, and has no effect what so ever on gsync's operation.

    To be on the safe side, capping the framerate 4 frames below gsync's refresh rate would pretty much guarantee not a single frame would tear.
  • Dragam
    879 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    OskooI_007 wrote: »
    You will only get tearing if the framerate goes above gsync's refresh rate. The whole point of gsync is to eliminate the need for vsync.

    The only thing enabling vsync in Nvidia control panel does is provide a safety net in case the framerate exceeds gsync's refresh rate.

    To be on the safe side, capping the framerate 4 frames below gsync's refresh rate would pretty much guarantee not a single frame would tear.

    Incorrect.

    Blurbusters guide also specifically states that you should turn vsync on in nvcp, and off on the game.

    https://www.blurbusters.com/gsync/gsync101-input-lag-tests-and-settings/14/
  • OskooI_007
    1273 postsMember, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    Nope. I'm 100% correct. I edited my post above to add clarity.
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