This Week in Battlefield V

Anyone have a router where gaming QoS actually works?

«13
disposalist
8594 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha Member
edited March 16
I just got a Netgear XR700 with the specific hope that the marketing about its gaming QoS was true.

It seems to not be.

I try BF1 without QoS and I get latency (and latency variation) free gaming.

I start up Netflix or YouTube on the same or a different PC and I see latency (and latency variation) symbols popping up and the experience is diminished.

I enable the traffic prioritization (specifiying port ranges, protocols and target machine) and the symbols come up even more, though it tells me it is now prioritizing thousands of packets.

I fiddle with bandwidth allocation (giving 100% to the gaming machine) and with the anti-buffer bloat settings (making sure, supposedly, that only 70% of max bandwidth is ever used). I still get latency issues.

Has anyone got a router that actually works to prioritise gaming such that some HD streaming on another part of the network (for example) doesn't effect it?

The XR700 appears to have no effect at all, QoS setup or not (in fact it seemed to make the symbols appear more regularly, but that could have been randomish).

Comments

  • TFBisquit
    1624 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    Hmm, nope not really. Got the R6400v2.
    I was thinking the same and disabled wifi in qos, that way most router resources will go to gaming. But all it did was cripple my wifi speeds and not much difference in gaming.
    Best is to keep it off, besides the WMM up and down for 2.4 and 5Ghz. By default the netgear routers are already optimized for gaming and the likes. You can open the ports for BFV though. Although that doesn't seem to matter either on my side.
  • Dragam
    871 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    edited March 16
    I just got a Netgear XR700 with the specific hope that the marketing about its gaming QoS was true.

    It seems to not be.

    I try BF1 without QoS and I get latency (and latency variation) free gaming.

    I start up Netflix or YouTube on the same or a different PC and I see latency (and latency variation) symbols popping up and the experience is diminished.

    I enable the traffic prioritization (specifiying port ranges, protocols and target machine) and the symbols come up even more, though it tells me it is now prioritizing thousands of packets.

    I fiddle with bandwidth allocation (giving 100% to the gaming machine) and with the anti-buffer bloat settings (making sure, supposedly, that only 70% of max bandwidth is ever used). I still get latency issues.

    Has anyone got a router that actually works to prioritise gaming such that some HD streaming on another part of the network (for example) doesn't effect it?

    The XR700 appears to have no effect at all, QoS setup or not (in fact it seemed to make the symbols appear more regularly, but that could have been randomish).

    What type of connection do you have... dsl, coax, fiber? And how much bandwidth?

    And it would be more beneficial if you enabled the ingame network graph, so you/we could see a more detailed overview of what is going on.
  • CSO7777
    1184 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha, Battlefield V Member
    edited March 17
    Personally I'm using a Unify router (ER-4). The unifi QOS (SQM) can lower throughput of the router, but it works very well. My router can still handle my connection without slow-downs (300Mbps).

    I can play while my wife streams video and surfs on the web without any issues whatsoever.

    Unifi routers doesn't do Wifi so you will have to get an access-point for that (or use your existing router as AP).

    Battlenonsense made a video about these routers, the cheapest ones (ER-X), cost almost nothing, but cannot handle high bandwitdh with QOS (less than 100Mbps):
    https://youtube.com/watch?v=o-g2P3R84dw

    And you just switch the feature on and it works without any tinkering.
  • disposalist
    8594 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha Member
    Dragam wrote: »
    I just got a Netgear XR700 with the specific hope that the marketing about its gaming QoS was true.

    It seems to not be.

    I try BF1 without QoS and I get latency (and latency variation) free gaming.

    I start up Netflix or YouTube on the same or a different PC and I see latency (and latency variation) symbols popping up and the experience is diminished.

    I enable the traffic prioritization (specifiying port ranges, protocols and target machine) and the symbols come up even more, though it tells me it is now prioritizing thousands of packets.

    I fiddle with bandwidth allocation (giving 100% to the gaming machine) and with the anti-buffer bloat settings (making sure, supposedly, that only 70% of max bandwidth is ever used). I still get latency issues.

    Has anyone got a router that actually works to prioritise gaming such that some HD streaming on another part of the network (for example) doesn't effect it?

    The XR700 appears to have no effect at all, QoS setup or not (in fact it seemed to make the symbols appear more regularly, but that could have been randomish).
    What type of connection do you have... dsl, coax, fiber? And how much bandwidth?

    And it would be more beneficial if you enabled the ingame network graph, so you/we could see a more detailed overview of what is going on.
    It's DSL. Fibre to the cabinet and a couple hundred meters of copper. I sure there's no problem with my line quality. Actually got checked by engineers a few times lately due to an intermittent disconnection issue (not quality - and which was fixed).

    65MB/s down 15MB/s up. As I say, I have no problems at all usually, but when Netflix or YouTube runs I get latency and latency variation symbols every few seconds.

    Some images. Would really appreciate your thoughts, thanks: -

    No Netflix, No QoS
    ys8awCD.png

    No Netflix, QoS On
    96JGQZv.png

    Netflix On, QoS Off
    lnciWqQ.png

    Netflix On, QoS On
    jeiefqQ.png

    You can see there's no difference between QoS on or off when Netflix isn't playing (which you'd expect), but when I play Netflix the difference between QoS on or off (though the router UI is saying it is detecting and prioritizing the game traffic) is that the latency peaks are *higher*.
  • Dragam
    871 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    Dragam wrote: »
    I just got a Netgear XR700 with the specific hope that the marketing about its gaming QoS was true.

    It seems to not be.

    I try BF1 without QoS and I get latency (and latency variation) free gaming.

    I start up Netflix or YouTube on the same or a different PC and I see latency (and latency variation) symbols popping up and the experience is diminished.

    I enable the traffic prioritization (specifiying port ranges, protocols and target machine) and the symbols come up even more, though it tells me it is now prioritizing thousands of packets.

    I fiddle with bandwidth allocation (giving 100% to the gaming machine) and with the anti-buffer bloat settings (making sure, supposedly, that only 70% of max bandwidth is ever used). I still get latency issues.

    Has anyone got a router that actually works to prioritise gaming such that some HD streaming on another part of the network (for example) doesn't effect it?

    The XR700 appears to have no effect at all, QoS setup or not (in fact it seemed to make the symbols appear more regularly, but that could have been randomish).
    What type of connection do you have... dsl, coax, fiber? And how much bandwidth?

    And it would be more beneficial if you enabled the ingame network graph, so you/we could see a more detailed overview of what is going on.
    It's DSL. Fibre to the cabinet and a couple hundred meters of copper. I sure there's no problem with my line quality. Actually got checked by engineers a few times lately due to an intermittent disconnection issue (not quality - and which was fixed).

    65MB/s down 15MB/s up. As I say, I have no problems at all usually, but when Netflix or YouTube runs I get latency and latency variation symbols every few seconds.

    Some images. Would really appreciate your thoughts, thanks: -

    No Netflix, No QoS
    ys8awCD.png

    No Netflix, QoS On
    96JGQZv.png

    Netflix On, QoS Off
    lnciWqQ.png

    Netflix On, QoS On
    jeiefqQ.png

    You can see there's no difference between QoS on or off when Netflix isn't playing (which you'd expect), but when I play Netflix the difference between QoS on or off (though the router UI is saying it is detecting and prioritizing the game traffic) is that the latency peaks are *higher*.

    Interesting... what is your setup in your home? Do you have a rj11 modem that you connect the XR700 to, or do you have a rj45 wallplug that you connect the XR700 directly to ?
  • disposalist
    8594 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha Member
    edited March 17
    RJ11 to a Netgear RM200 in Modem only mode. RJ45 out to the Nighthawk.
    Post edited by disposalist on
  • Dragam
    871 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    edited March 17
    RJ11 to a Netgear RM200 in Modem only mode. RJ45 out to the Nighthawk.

    I am not able to find anything on netgear rm200 - do you mean dm200 ? :)

    And if so, is it an ISP provided modem, or did you purchase it yourself?
  • disposalist
    8594 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha Member
    Dragam wrote: »
    RJ11 to a Netgear RM200 in Modem only mode. RJ45 out to the Nighthawk.

    I am not able to find anything on netgear rm200 - do you mean dm200 ? :)

    And if so, is it an ISP provided modem, or did you purchase it yourself?
    Sorry yeah. DM200 is my modem.
  • Dragam
    871 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    edited March 17
    Dragam wrote: »
    RJ11 to a Netgear RM200 in Modem only mode. RJ45 out to the Nighthawk.

    I am not able to find anything on netgear rm200 - do you mean dm200 ? :)

    And if so, is it an ISP provided modem, or did you purchase it yourself?
    Sorry yeah. DM200 is my modem.

    As in one you bought yourself ?

    Anyways, has this been an issue ever since you got that modem? Before you got that modem? Or is it a recent event ?
  • disposalist
    8594 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha Member
    Dragam wrote: »
    Dragam wrote: »
    RJ11 to a Netgear RM200 in Modem only mode. RJ45 out to the Nighthawk.
    I am not able to find anything on netgear rm200 - do you mean dm200 ? :)

    And if so, is it an ISP provided modem, or did you purchase it yourself?
    Sorry yeah. DM200 is my modem.
    As in one you bought yourself ?

    Anyways, has this been an issue ever since you got that modem? Before you got that modem? Or is it a recent event ?
    The DM200 is new also. Recently got it and the Nighthawk.

    Have gone back to my Draytek 2680 for now (which has a built in modem), but it doesn't have port-based prioritisation at all. No worse than the RM200 + Nighthawk setup though.
  • Dragam
    871 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    Dragam wrote: »
    Dragam wrote: »
    RJ11 to a Netgear RM200 in Modem only mode. RJ45 out to the Nighthawk.
    I am not able to find anything on netgear rm200 - do you mean dm200 ? :)

    And if so, is it an ISP provided modem, or did you purchase it yourself?
    Sorry yeah. DM200 is my modem.
    As in one you bought yourself ?

    Anyways, has this been an issue ever since you got that modem? Before you got that modem? Or is it a recent event ?
    The DM200 is new also. Recently got it and the Nighthawk.

    Have gone back to my Draytek 2680 for now (which has a built in modem), but it doesn't have port-based prioritisation at all. No worse than the RM200 + Nighthawk setup though.

    Well, seeing as you don't have that much bandwidth, you could take the advice from cso7777 and get the ER-X - would be a very simple solution.
  • disposalist
    8594 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha Member
    edited March 18
    Dragam wrote: »
    Dragam wrote: »
    Dragam wrote: »
    RJ11 to a Netgear RM200 in Modem only mode. RJ45 out to the Nighthawk.
    I am not able to find anything on netgear rm200 - do you mean dm200 ? :)

    And if so, is it an ISP provided modem, or did you purchase it yourself?
    Sorry yeah. DM200 is my modem.
    As in one you bought yourself ?

    Anyways, has this been an issue ever since you got that modem? Before you got that modem? Or is it a recent event ?
    The DM200 is new also. Recently got it and the Nighthawk.

    Have gone back to my Draytek 2680 for now (which has a built in modem), but it doesn't have port-based prioritisation at all. No worse than the RM200 + Nighthawk setup though.
    Well, seeing as you don't have that much bandwidth, you could take the advice from cso7777 and get the ER-X - would be a very simple solution.
    Just doing a bit of research on them now.

    I wonder if you or @cso7777 could recommend a model for me? I'm looking to splash out (the Nighthawk was near £450!) and get myself a top notch router that will future proof me if my street goes with FTTP/FTTH (probably around 330MB/s) and can handle QoS, so I don't mind moving up the ubiquiti tree somewhat.

    Would an ER-4 do me, or does the ER-Pro8 have a better tech/interface/whatever?

    I appreciate the advice, thanks!

    EDIT: I have already returned the Nighthawk. It had additional disappointments with the UI being slow and clunky and basic. Not expected from a device with quad core processor and a modern custom UI.

    Also have ordered an ASUS RT-AX88U and an ASUS GT-AX11000 but I'm losing faith that these mainstream 'gaming' products are really as good as they should be compared to products from companies like Ubiquiti.
  • disposalist
    8594 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha Member
    edited March 18
    Dragam wrote:
    Dragam wrote: »
    Dragam wrote: »
    RJ11 to a Netgear RM200 in Modem only mode. RJ45 out to the Nighthawk.
    I am not able to find anything on netgear rm200 - do you mean dm200 ? :)

    And if so, is it an ISP provided modem, or did you purchase it yourself?
    Sorry yeah. DM200 is my modem.
    As in one you bought yourself ?

    Anyways, has this been an issue ever since you got that modem? Before you got that modem? Or is it a recent event ?
    The DM200 is new also. Recently got it and the Nighthawk.

    Have gone back to my Draytek 2680 for now (which has a built in modem), but it doesn't have port-based prioritisation at all. No worse than the RM200 + Nighthawk setup though.
    Well, seeing as you don't have that much bandwidth, you could take the advice from cso7777 and get the ER-X - would be a very simple solution.
    Just doing a bit of research on them now.

    I wonder if you or @cso7777 could recommend a model for me? I'm looking to splash out (the Nighthawk was near £450!) and get myself a top notch router that will future proof me if my street goes with FTTP/FTTH (probably around 330MB/s) and can handle QoS, so I don't mind moving up the ubiquiti tree somewhat.

    Would an ER-4 do me, or does the ER-Pro8 have a better tech and interface (EdgeOS)?

    EDIT2: Watching Battlenonsense's video (Chris is *such* a valuable YouTuber!) I get this info there. I can see the EP-R8 has an adequate MAX bandwidth with QoS, though the minimum, as Chris says, is the only reliable guide (100 MB/s) so the ER-Pro8 (min 200) might be a better future-proofed choice *but* I suppose since my FTTP might be many months or even a year away, maybe I should just get an ER-X and upgrade later.

    I appreciate the advice, thanks!

    EDIT1: I have already returned the Nighthawk. It had additional disappointments with the UI being slow and clunky and basic. Not expected from a device with quad core processor and a modern custom UI.

    Also have ordered an ASUS RT-AX88U and an ASUS GT-AX11000 but I'm losing faith that these mainstream 'gaming' products are really as good as they should be compared to products from companies like Ubiquiti.

    EDIT3: I just ordered an ER-X. At £40 it will be a good backup/test unit even if one of the Asus routers is good. Also, if it is just as useful as the Asus routers, I guess I'd be a fool to keep either of them when they cost about £300!
    Post edited by disposalist on
  • Dragam
    871 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    Dragam wrote:
    Dragam wrote: »
    Dragam wrote: »



    Yeah, battlenonsense does some great indepth tech testing, especially in regards to network in regards to games.

    I agree that the mainstream products are... well mostly brand / style / wifi speeds. They don't have amazing QoS. I would personally just cancel the order for the asus units, and stick with the ER-X until you at some point can get more than 100 mbps speeds where you live. At that point there will likely be new products in the market, that are even better than the current ones :) But you could also just get the ER-4 now - i am not able to find the smart queue speeds for the ER-4 (it isn't included in the data sheets), but its hardware is surpirior to the ER-Pro8 (the router cpu is the limiting factor for QoS speeds, and the ER-4 has a 4 core 1 ghz cpu vs a 2 core 1 ghz cpu in the ER-Pro8). And as cso7777 says, it has no issues handling his 300 mbps connection.

    In regards to the XR700, i've heard that it has alot of "early day" issues - it might get resolved over time, but that doesn't help you much now :P
  • disposalist
    8594 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha Member
    Dragam wrote: »
    Yeah, battlenonsense does some great indepth tech testing, especially in regards to network in regards to games.

    I agree that the mainstream products are... well mostly brand / style / wifi speeds. They don't have amazing QoS. I would personally just cancel the order for the asus units, and stick with the ER-X until you at some point can get more than 100 mbps speeds where you live. At that point there will likely be new products in the market, that are even better than the current ones :) But you could also just get the ER-4 now - i am not able to find the smart queue speeds for the ER-4 (it isn't included in the data sheets), but its hardware is surpirior to the ER-Pro8 (the router cpu is the limiting factor for QoS speeds, and the ER-4 has a 4 core 1 ghz cpu vs a 2 core 1 ghz cpu in the ER-Pro8). And as cso7777 says, it has no issues handling his 300 mbps connection.

    In regards to the XR700, i've heard that it has alot of "early day" issues - it might get resolved over time, but that doesn't help you much now :P
    Thanks very much for the advice and info.

    As I say, I can very much seeing me return the Asus products - they are on their way now, though - just hope Amazon doesn't get too annoyed with me! I have spent thousands with them over the years and am a Prime customer and they've never quibbled in the past, though.

    I don't know what else buyers can do, though. I read reviews of them all and they all say they have good QoS for gaming. The Nighthawk QoS just did not work. Just got to keep buying and returning until one of them actually lives up to the marketing and review hype.

    I found the same with gaming headsets. Ordered several and they were all inferior to the home made setup I ended up with.
    Same with keyboards. I must have gone through 6 or 7 'quiet' gaming keyboards, none of which were at all even when explicitly stated in the marketing.

    Big brands these days seem to be wholly lead by marketing and not actually product performance. Why to consumers keep consuming this stuff?
  • g0merpile
    572 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Hardline, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    Dragam wrote: »
    Dragam wrote: »
    I just got a Netgear XR700 with the specific hope that the marketing about its gaming QoS was true.

    It seems to not be.

    I try BF1 without QoS and I get latency (and latency variation) free gaming.

    I start up Netflix or YouTube on the same or a different PC and I see latency (and latency variation) symbols popping up and the experience is diminished.

    I enable the traffic prioritization (specifiying port ranges, protocols and target machine) and the symbols come up even more, though it tells me it is now prioritizing thousands of packets.

    I fiddle with bandwidth allocation (giving 100% to the gaming machine) and with the anti-buffer bloat settings (making sure, supposedly, that only 70% of max bandwidth is ever used). I still get latency issues.

    Has anyone got a router that actually works to prioritise gaming such that some HD streaming on another part of the network (for example) doesn't effect it?

    The XR700 appears to have no effect at all, QoS setup or not (in fact it seemed to make the symbols appear more regularly, but that could have been randomish).
    What type of connection do you have... dsl, coax, fiber? And how much bandwidth?

    And it would be more beneficial if you enabled the ingame network graph, so you/we could see a more detailed overview of what is going on.
    It's DSL. Fibre to the cabinet and a couple hundred meters of copper. I sure there's no problem with my line quality. Actually got checked by engineers a few times lately due to an intermittent disconnection issue (not quality - and which was fixed).

    65MB/s down 15MB/s up. As I say, I have no problems at all usually, but when Netflix or YouTube runs I get latency and latency variation symbols every few seconds.

    Some images. Would really appreciate your thoughts, thanks: -

    No Netflix, No QoS
    ys8awCD.png

    No Netflix, QoS On
    96JGQZv.png

    Netflix On, QoS Off
    lnciWqQ.png

    Netflix On, QoS On
    jeiefqQ.png

    You can see there's no difference between QoS on or off when Netflix isn't playing (which you'd expect), but when I play Netflix the difference between QoS on or off (though the router UI is saying it is detecting and prioritizing the game traffic) is that the latency peaks are *higher*.

    Interesting... what is your setup in your home? Do you have a rj11 modem that you connect the XR700 to, or do you have a rj45 wallplug that you connect the XR700 directly to ?

    Creating a QoS policy in windows is the best way for this, have your computer handle the qos in a policy.
  • disposalist
    8594 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha Member
    g0merpile wrote: »
    Dragam wrote: »
    Dragam wrote: »
    I just got a Netgear XR700 with the specific hope that the marketing about its gaming QoS was true.

    It seems to not be.

    I try BF1 without QoS and I get latency (and latency variation) free gaming.

    I start up Netflix or YouTube on the same or a different PC and I see latency (and latency variation) symbols popping up and the experience is diminished.

    I enable the traffic prioritization (specifiying port ranges, protocols and target machine) and the symbols come up even more, though it tells me it is now prioritizing thousands of packets.

    I fiddle with bandwidth allocation (giving 100% to the gaming machine) and with the anti-buffer bloat settings (making sure, supposedly, that only 70% of max bandwidth is ever used). I still get latency issues.

    Has anyone got a router that actually works to prioritise gaming such that some HD streaming on another part of the network (for example) doesn't effect it?

    The XR700 appears to have no effect at all, QoS setup or not (in fact it seemed to make the symbols appear more regularly, but that could have been randomish).
    What type of connection do you have... dsl, coax, fiber? And how much bandwidth?

    And it would be more beneficial if you enabled the ingame network graph, so you/we could see a more detailed overview of what is going on.
    It's DSL. Fibre to the cabinet and a couple hundred meters of copper. I sure there's no problem with my line quality. Actually got checked by engineers a few times lately due to an intermittent disconnection issue (not quality - and which was fixed).

    65MB/s down 15MB/s up. As I say, I have no problems at all usually, but when Netflix or YouTube runs I get latency and latency variation symbols every few seconds.

    Some images. Would really appreciate your thoughts, thanks: -

    No Netflix, No QoS
    ys8awCD.png

    No Netflix, QoS On
    96JGQZv.png

    Netflix On, QoS Off
    lnciWqQ.png

    Netflix On, QoS On
    jeiefqQ.png

    You can see there's no difference between QoS on or off when Netflix isn't playing (which you'd expect), but when I play Netflix the difference between QoS on or off (though the router UI is saying it is detecting and prioritizing the game traffic) is that the latency peaks are *higher*.

    Interesting... what is your setup in your home? Do you have a rj11 modem that you connect the XR700 to, or do you have a rj45 wallplug that you connect the XR700 directly to ?

    Creating a QoS policy in windows is the best way for this, have your computer handle the qos in a policy.
    I did just read about this, but it appears to be only port range and protocol based rather than any 'intelligent' packet analysis? This is how the Nighthawk was doing it and, basically, it didn't appear to help.

    Have you done this for BF1? Can you watch Netflix and play BF1 with no change in either?
  • Dragam
    871 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    edited March 19
    Dragam wrote: »
    Yeah, battlenonsense does some great indepth tech testing, especially in regards to network in regards to games.

    I agree that the mainstream products are... well mostly brand / style / wifi speeds. They don't have amazing QoS. I would personally just cancel the order for the asus units, and stick with the ER-X until you at some point can get more than 100 mbps speeds where you live. At that point there will likely be new products in the market, that are even better than the current ones :) But you could also just get the ER-4 now - i am not able to find the smart queue speeds for the ER-4 (it isn't included in the data sheets), but its hardware is surpirior to the ER-Pro8 (the router cpu is the limiting factor for QoS speeds, and the ER-4 has a 4 core 1 ghz cpu vs a 2 core 1 ghz cpu in the ER-Pro8). And as cso7777 says, it has no issues handling his 300 mbps connection.

    In regards to the XR700, i've heard that it has alot of "early day" issues - it might get resolved over time, but that doesn't help you much now :P
    Thanks very much for the advice and info.

    As I say, I can very much seeing me return the Asus products - they are on their way now, though - just hope Amazon doesn't get too annoyed with me! I have spent thousands with them over the years and am a Prime customer and they've never quibbled in the past, though.

    I don't know what else buyers can do, though. I read reviews of them all and they all say they have good QoS for gaming. The Nighthawk QoS just did not work. Just got to keep buying and returning until one of them actually lives up to the marketing and review hype.

    I found the same with gaming headsets. Ordered several and they were all inferior to the home made setup I ended up with.
    Same with keyboards. I must have gone through 6 or 7 'quiet' gaming keyboards, none of which were at all even when explicitly stated in the marketing.

    Big brands these days seem to be wholly lead by marketing and not actually product performance. Why to consumers keep consuming this stuff?

    Well unless you deal alot with tech stuff, you basically only know what you read... and if reviewers say that they are good products, then people will continue to buy it.

    Anyways i reckon you will be satisfied with your ubiquiti router :)

    Edited to remove rude comment. Keep it respectful please ~Rtas
    Post edited by EA_Rtas on
  • Dragam
    871 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    edited March 18
    delete
  • disposalist
    8594 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha Member
    I just tried the Windows local policy thing. Didn't work. I set one up for bf1.exe and when I view Netflix on the same computer I see the pulsing latency spikes.
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