Weekly BF

Are we safe online gaming?

buckiebull
84 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Hardline, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha, Battlefield V Member
Tell me this if people can use cheats in game & don't get an immediate Ban, how easy is it for hackers to do the same (Including these people who create the tools needed) to your account & PC from Origin/Battlefield?
The other thing is how & why are these websites not been taken down or hidden by the likes of Google and what is EA doing about it as at the end of the day we are all targets. 
Just saying!

Comments

  • Niick1402
    80 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, BF1IncursionsAlpha, Battlefield V Member
    A hacker in a game (=cheater) isn't comparable to a hacker who breaks into systems. A cheater first has to be detected before he can be banned, depending on how the anti-cheat solution works this can be immediate after using/activating a cheat. I remember reading all bans in BFV are done manually tough.
    .
    For the hackers who break into systems it really depends on how skilled they are, how good your system is protected, your knowledge about risks for getting viruses. A recent Origin update fixed a security flaw that made it possible for someone to remotely run code on your machine. A user first had to click on a link to make this possible however. Someone who wants to hack into your systems is probably not going to do so through BF or Origin and will probably target a more interesting persons to hack anyways instead of a random BF player.
    .
    Sites can only by taken down through the legal system or if they violate the TOS of their hosting company. Google doesn't hide links unless they're forced to. No idea if EA takes legal action against cheat creators.
  • buckiebull
    84 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Hardline, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha, Battlefield V Member
    Yes that's all good and well, but these people that create these codes for online cheat systems are managing to bypass all these barriers & people are buying them or some cases getting them for free! 
    The scary part for everyone to think about is once in they can either leave with your info Bank details/ profiles etc and sell them on the Black web or and a  DOS attack!
    look at Sony a few years ago and more recently carfone warehouse!
    So how safe are we really!
  • JPhysics
    804 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    Use two step verification to reduce the risk of your account getting hacked.  Do what you can to secure your account access and move on.  I tend not to go through life worried about what could happen.
  • Dragam
    874 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    edited May 3
    Quick everyone, grap your tinfoil hats !

    Yes, the people actually coding the hack tools could probably hack you... but why on earth would they bother? They go for easy money, and hacking private individuals is alot of effort for very little gain. Hence why when private individuals get "hacked" it's usually trojan and / or keylogging software they were stupid enough to download themselfs - barely anyone actually gets hacked.

    Big corporations get hacked because there is alot to be gained by doing that for the hackers, but again there is barely anything to be gained by hacking private individuals, so the odds of that happening is close to nonexistent, and gaming online makes absolutely ZERO difference in this regard.
  • Niick1402
    80 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, BF1IncursionsAlpha, Battlefield V Member
    Yes that's all good and well, but these people that create these codes for online cheat systems are managing to bypass all these barriers & people are buying them or some cases getting them for free! 
    The scary part for everyone to think about is once in they can either leave with your info Bank details/ profiles etc and sell them on the Black web or and a  DOS attack!
    look at Sony a few years ago and more recently carfone warehouse!
    So how safe are we really!
    I guess you're talking about the anticheat system being the barrier cheat devs can bypass?  If it's not the anti cheat or there's more barriers they're able to bypass please say wich ones. First of all i don't think they're even capable of bypassing(=not getting checked) the anti-cheat system, they will try to keep cheats undetectable by it. Secondly: anyone using any cheat for BFV will not be able to get into your system with it to gain access to your bank details (useless anyways without your physical card or a perfect copy of it + your pincode, both are needed for authentication), get logins+passwords for any account you have, any other info or files.  In order for anyone to DDOS(=sabotaging a connection) you they will need your IP or another way to connect to your network. AFAIK it's not possible for them to figure out your IP through BFV with or without cheats. (should be made impossible if there is a way) There's not much incentive for them to DDOS attack you anyways as they gain nothing out of it and might even have to spend recourses to do so. Game cheats pose no dangers to your system.


  • Mhill2029
    123 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    The only ones capable of compromising your system are those that coded the hacking/bypass software in the first place, the ones ingame "cheating" aren't of sufficient intelligence to tie their own shoelaces let alone understand compromising a networks infrastructure. Sure any moron can access someone's account with enough time or the account holder is irresponsible with their details (which happens a lot).

    It's the same for DDOS attacks, anyone can do that with the correct software and time on their hands (although it does take a combined effort to flood a server(s) of a large corporation). It's those behind the code that are the intelligent folks, that spent years learning. 

    As others have said it wouldn't be worth their time to focus on a single individuals system. And when it comes to financial institutions, it's almost impossible to get away with these days. And the penalties of getting caught are severe enough to put anyone off even attempting such activities. Most of these smart individuals are making money risk free, by just selling software they created. And when it comes to online gaming cheats, these people are making a fortune.
  • Carbonic
    1468 postsMember, Moderator, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Hardline, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha, Battlefield V Moderator
    Game cheats and system vulnerbilities are two different things.
    Online gaming is probably one of the safest things you can do online, visiting websites is worse, all your background applications and Windows are more likely attack vectors.
  • 5hadyBrady
    436 postsMember, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    Carbonic said:
    Game cheats and system vulnerbilities are two different things.
    Online gaming is probably one of the safest things you can do online, visiting websites is worse, all your background applications and Windows are more likely attack vectors.
    It's actually not. I wish EA would grow a pair and actually take action on the people distributing and using cheats on their privately owned servers. Adults are developing and selling software that is used to destroy EA's business, and they allow it to happen. It's already illegal. You're not allowed to hack a privately owned server, especially a business server, with malicious intent. Cheaters are destroying businesses while the business owners stand by like a bunch of cowards and let them run roughshod over the entire operation. This is no different than a hacker attacking your private home network. I would actually argue this is worse, because EA employs people, and pays taxes. EA as a company should be extraordinarily more valuable to the United States economy than some criminals selling software that is used exclusively to attack privately owned servers owned by a private business. This is no different than hacking a businesses private servers. Or , hacking your competitors servers and destroying their product. EA owns the servers. Why are they letting criminals destroy their business and reputation? I know 12 year old kids like to pretend like "cheating isn't criminal", but they're sadly mistaken. You are destroying a business with your juvenile nonsense. These businesses pay taxes, employ hundreds of people who also pay taxes, have investors and shareholders investing in the company, and you're using software that is created exclusively to destroy their business. Every time you cheat in a video game, you are essentially a criminal. You're basically walking into a private business and destroying it.
  • Carbonic
    1468 postsMember, Moderator, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Hardline, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha, Battlefield V Moderator
    edited May 5
    I was responding to the part of thread that is about if your account or computer can be hacked through Battlefield/Origin. It's not about if cheating is more likely to happen than people getting hacked. It's not about the impact of cheaters on EA. You are getting quite off-track here.

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