Kukri, but no Gurkhas. How about a little extension to WW1 but outside of Europe.

tahahachim
postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Hardline, Battlefield, Battlefield 1 Member
A lot of weapons in BF1 are awesome, but some of the factions that wielded those weapons aren't there. Where's the Gurkha battalion, The Goums, etc... It'd be interesting changing up from Euro powers fighting, and actually fun. If you chose to make some of the maps, it will be legitimately insane. The trenches were terrifying, imagine attacking an enemy in the forest, blind, even airplanes couldn't take pictures due to how thick the shrubs are. Here's some battles of WW1 that happened outside the European theatre. (credit to wiki)

North Africa:
Zaian War, 1914–1921

The Zaian War was fought between France and the Zaian confederation of Berber tribes in Morocco between 1914 and 1921. Morocco had become a French protectorate in 1912 and the French army extended French influence eastwards through the Middle Atlas mountains towards French Algeria. The Zaians, led by Mouha ou Hammou Zayani, quickly lost the towns of Taza and Khénifra but managed to inflict many casualties on the French, who responded by establishing groupes mobiles, combined arms formations that mixed regular and irregular infantry, cavalry and artillery. By 1914 the French had 80,000 troops in Morocco. Two-thirds of the French troops were withdrawn from 1914–1915 for service in France and more than 600 French soldiers were killed at the Battle of El Herri on 13 November 1914. Lyautey, the French governor, reorganised his forces and pursued a forward policy rather than passive defence. The French retained most of their territory despite intelligence and financial support provided by the Central Powers to the Zaian Confederation and raids which caused losses to the French who were already short of manpower.[

West Africa:
Kamerun campaign, 1914–1916

By 25 August 1914, British forces in Nigeria had moved into Kamerun towards Mara in the far north, towards Garua in the centre and towards Nsanakang in the south. British forces moving towards Garua under the command of Colonel MacLear were ordered to push to the German border post at Tepe near Garua. The first engagement between British and German troops in the campaign took place at the Battle of Tepe, eventually resulting in German withdrawal. In the far north British forces attempted to take the German fort at Mora but failed and began a siege which lasted until the end of the campaign. British forces in the south attacked Nsanakang and were defeated and almost completely destroyed by German counterattacks at the Battle of Nsanakong. MacLear then pushed his forces further inland towards the German stronghold of Garua, but was repulsed in the First Battle of Garua on 31 August.

In 1915 the German forces, except for those at Mora and Garua, withdrew to the mountains near the new capital of Jaunde. In the spring the German forces delayed or repulsed Allied attacks and a force under Captain von Crailsheim from Garua conducted an offensive into Nigeria and fought the Battle of Gurin. General Frederick Hugh Cunliffe began the Second Battle of Garua in June, which was a British victory. Allied units in northern Kamerun were freed to push into the interior, where the Germans were defeated at the Battle of Ngaundere on 29 June. Cunliffe advanced south to Jaunde but was held up by heavy rains and his force joined the Siege of Mora.When the weather improved, Cunliffe moved further south, captured a German fort at the Battle of Banjo on 6 November and occupied several towns by the end of the year. In December, the forces of Cunliffe and Dobell made contact and made ready to conduct an assault on Jaunde. In this year most of Neukamerun had been fully occupied by Belgian and French troops, who also began to prepare for an attack on Jaunde.

German forces began to cross into the Spanish colony of Rio Muni on 23 December 1915 and with Allied forces pressing in on Jaunde from all sides, the German commander Carl Zimmermann ordered the remaining German units and civilians to escape into Rio Muni. By mid-February, c. 7,000 Schutztruppen and c. 7,000 civilians had reached Spanish territory.[35][36] On 18 February the Siege of Mora ended with the surrender of the garrison.[37] Most Kamerunians remained in Muni but the Germans eventually moved to Fernando Po and some were allowed by Spain to travel to the Netherlands to go home. Some Kamerunians including the paramount chief of the Beti people moved to Madrid, where they lived as visiting nobility on German funds.

East African:

Belgian-Congo Conflict
The Belgian Force Publique of 12,417 men formed three groups, each with 7,000–8,000 porters, yet expected to live off the land. The 1915 harvest had been exhausted and the 1916 harvest had not matured; Belgian requisitions alienated the local civilians. On 5 April, the Belgians offered an armistice to the Germans and then on 12 April commenced hostilities. The Force Publique advanced between Kigali and Nyanza under the command of General Charles Tombeur, Colonel Molitor and Colonel Olsen and captured Kigali on 6 May. The Germans in Burundi were forced back and by 17 June the Belgians had occupied Burundi and Rwanda. The Force Publique and the British Lake Force then advanced towards Tabora, an administrative centre of central German East Africa. The Allies moved in three columns and took Biharamulo, Mwanza, Karema, Kigoma and Ujiji. Tabora was captured unopposed on 19 September. To forestall Belgian claims on the German colony, Smuts ordered Belgian forces back to Congo, leaving them as occupiers only in Rwanda and Burundi. The British were obliged to recall Belgian troops in 1917 and after this the Allies coordinated campaign plans.

South Africa:

German West South Africa, (1914-15)
An invasion of German South West Africa from the south failed at the Battle of Sandfontein (25 September 1914), close to the border with the Cape Colony. German fusiliers inflicted a serious defeat on the British troops and the survivors returned to British territory. The Germans began an invasion of South Africa to forestall another invasion attempt and the Battle of Kakamas took place on 4 February 1915, between South African and German forces, a skirmish for control of two river fords over the Orange River. The South Africans prevented the Germans from gaining control of the fords and crossing the river. By February 1915, the South Africans were ready to occupy German territory. Botha put Smuts in command of the southern forces while he commanded the northern forces. Botha arrived at Swakopmund on 11 February and continued to build up his invasion force at Walfish Bay (or Walvis Bay), a South African enclave about halfway along the coast of German South West Africa. In March Botha began an advance from Swakopmund along the Swakop valley with its railway line and captured Otjimbingwe, Karibib, Friedrichsfelde, Wilhelmsthal and Okahandja and then entered Windhuk on 5 May 1915.

The Germans offered surrender terms, which were rejected by Botha and the war continued. On 12 May Botha declared martial law and divided his forces into four contingents, which cut off German forces in the interior from the coastal regions of Kunene and Kaokoveld and fanned out into the north-east. Lukin went along the railway line from Swakopmund to Tsumeb. The other two columns rapidly advanced on the right flank, Myburgh to Otavi junction and Manie Botha to Tsumeb and the terminus of the railway. German forces in the north-west fought the Battle of Otavi on 1 July but were defeated and surrendered at Khorab on 9 July 1915. In the south, Smuts landed at the South West African naval base at Luderitzbucht, then advanced inland and captured Keetmanshoop on 20 May. The South Africans linked with two columns which had advanced over the border from South Africa. Smuts advanced north along the railway line to Berseba and on 26 May, after two days' fighting captured Gibeon. The Germans in the south were forced to retreat northwards towards Windhuk and Botha's force. On 9 July the German forces in the south surrendered.


This game has so much potential, lets show the dev what else they could get their hands to if they're getting writers/developers block!
Keep up the good work Dice/EA!
Love Antti_Kokko



Comments

  • Tullzter
    1082 postsMember, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    There are hundreds of factions and thousands of sub conflicts during that time period, but i do believe DICE chose to stick with the main combat theater and main fighting forces
  • sfreeman73
    757 postsMember, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE Member
    Funnily enough I've noticed the playable armies happen to be of the countries the game is primarily sold in. Coincidence?
  • TylymiezWelho
    42 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    You mean like Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman empires?
  • skoopsro
    308 postsMember, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Hardline, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha Member
    You mean like Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman empires?

    Those territories once run by those empires still exist. And there is a significant middle eastern and central and eastern european population who play battlefield 1. I would not be suprised to see an inclusion of the far eastern/pacific front in the last two DLCs. It may be unlikely but i wouldnt be suprised. It would be quite neat to see that theatre included.

    Looking forward to galipoli. Would love to see more italian front battles also. Maybe the battles of the isonzo river, there were 12 of them and they were massive. More american battles will probably be in the final dlc.
  • sfreeman73
    757 postsMember, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE Member
    Speaking of gallipoli it wouldrfrr be nice to see the inclusion of the anzac's brave men who fought and died for a country that wasn't theirs
  • mph199
    97 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Hardline, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, Battlefield V Member
    sfreeman73 wrote: »
    Funnily enough I've noticed the playable armies happen to be of the countries the game is primarily sold in. Coincidence?

    Funnily enough I've noticed the playable armies happen to be of the countries who dedicated the most manpower, funding and equipment, and had the biggest stake in the outcome of the war... Coincidence?
  • purpleflump
    260 postsMember, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE Member
    Shock horror you missed out the Polish stories from this... your just as bad
  • sfreeman73
    757 postsMember, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE Member
    edited September 2017
    mph199 wrote: »
    sfreeman73 wrote: »
    Funnily enough I've noticed the playable armies happen to be of the countries the game is primarily sold in. Coincidence?

    Funnily enough I've noticed the playable armies happen to be of the countries who dedicated the most manpower, funding and equipment, and had the biggest stake in the outcome of the war... Coincidence?

    Yes it is (I joke if cause)
  • TankGewehr1917
    1055 postsMember, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1 Member
    Shock horror you missed out the Polish stories from this... your just as bad

    The lands that comprise Modern-day Poland were at the time split between Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Russia, and at least two of the maps in ITNOTT are set in Poland. I think Brusilov keep is in Ukraine I'm not sure though.

    I would love to see a couple of maps from the Siege of Tsingtao between Japan and Germany, with one set in a port and the other on a railway in the jungle with rivers or something. Maybe these could be the extra maps DICE adds to turning tides.

    I'd also love to see the front in Armenia between the Russians and Ottomans but this could be unlikely due to the whole genocide controversy the Turkish government denies and would probably result in BF1 being banned in Turkey.
  • JesseA421
    45 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Hardline, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, Battlefield V Member
    tldr but how are u going to kill someone with tiny pickles
  • PackersDK
    737 postsMember, Battlefield, Battlefield 1 Member
    edited September 2017
    sfreeman73 wrote: »
    Speaking of gallipoli it wouldrfrr be nice to see the inclusion of the anzac's brave men who fought and died for a country that wasn't theirs

    Ohh, that's a bit simplistic :)
  • jmgargoyle
    2463 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, Battlefield V Member
    Still two more dlcs to go folks.... some may get their wishes still....
  • PackersDK
    737 postsMember, Battlefield, Battlefield 1 Member
    Two!? I thought it was just one, the Turning Tides, or whatever it's called.

    Well, can't claim to be on top of these things, so if there is a fourth, that's great!
  • jmgargoyle
    2463 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, Battlefield V Member
    PackersDK wrote: »
    Two!? I thought it was just one, the Turning Tides, or whatever it's called.

    Well, can't claim to be on top of these things, so if there is a fourth, that's great!

    Yes there's a fourth dlc called apocalypse....
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