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Guide on how to correctly configure G-sync

Comments

  • jasonvp
    91 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Hardline, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha, Battlefield V Member
    Dragam wrote: »
    Blurbusters guide also specifically states that you should turn vsync on in nvcp, and off on the game.

    https://www.blurbusters.com/gsync/gsync101-input-lag-tests-and-settings/14/

    I don't like to get into these VSync on/off debates, because they rage ad infinitum. I'm basically 100% positive that the guys at Blurbusters are wrong about this specific issue. But since I'm just some guy on the 'net, no one's going to pay much attention to what I say. What I do is disable VSync everywhere. In-game and NVCP. Done and done. I want nothing to do with that gawd-awful tech. No tearing, no noticeable input lag, nothing but silky smooth gaming.

    But I'm not Blurbusters. ;-)
  • Dragam
    688 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    jasonvp wrote: »
    Dragam wrote: »
    Blurbusters guide also specifically states that you should turn vsync on in nvcp, and off on the game.

    https://www.blurbusters.com/gsync/gsync101-input-lag-tests-and-settings/14/

    I don't like to get into these VSync on/off debates, because they rage ad infinitum. I'm basically 100% positive that the guys at Blurbusters are wrong about this specific issue. But since I'm just some guy on the 'net, no one's going to pay much attention to what I say. What I do is disable VSync everywhere. In-game and NVCP. Done and done. I want nothing to do with that gawd-awful tech. No tearing, no noticeable input lag, nothing but silky smooth gaming.

    But I'm not Blurbusters. ;-)

    Might be, everyone is wrong at least occasionally.
    I am just quite certain i saw tearing last time i tried to use g-sync without forcing v-sync.
    I am thinking if that might be due to sli though, which inherently has higher frametime variences between the gpus than single gpu. Let's say that you are running 60hz, gpu 1 gets a frametime spike to 20ms, gpu 2 in turn renders the next frame at 14 ms, then you'd get a tear, as the panel updates at a maximum of every 16.6 ms.
  • OskooI_007
    25 postsMember, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    Probably. Frametime variences do cause tearing. I've also noticed that in-game framerate limiters have more frametime fluctuations than the RTSS framerate limiter does.

    In one of BattlleNonSense's videos, he had to limit the framerate 10 frames below FreeSync's refresh rate before the tearing stopped. Seems FreeSync needs to be capped lower than Gsync.
  • Red_Label_Scotch
    451 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    What about just turning it off?
  • OskooI_007
    25 postsMember, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    Turning off gsync will cause screen tearing to happen all the time. Even if you can't see the tear lines at high refresh rates, the image on screen will still stutter/judder compared to using gsync.

    Input lag is vitually identical.

    blur-busters-gsync-101-gsync-vs-vsync-off-60Hz.png

    At 144+fps there's no difference between vsync off and gsync.

    blur-busters-gsync-101-gsync-vs-vsync-off-144Hz.png

    https://www.blurbusters.com/gsync/gsync101-input-lag-tests-and-settings/6/
  • Dragam
    688 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    OskooI_007 wrote: »
    Probably. Frametime variences do cause tearing. I've also noticed that in-game framerate limiters have more frametime fluctuations than the RTSS framerate limiter does.

    In one of BattlleNonSense's videos, he had to limit the framerate 10 frames below FreeSync's refresh rate before the tearing stopped. Seems FreeSync needs to be capped lower than Gsync.

    I find that rtss is often more reliable than the ingame framelimiters aswell - another reason why i prefer using rtss :)
  • ballFetcher
    73 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, BF1IncursionsAlpha, Battlefield V Member
    ..
    - V-Sync, speaking in terms of G-Sync, is no longer the V-Sync of the past, it now works in tandem with G-Sync and should be turned on in NCP (Control Panel) no matter what! "Preferred Refresh Rate" should be set to highest available as well.

    Thanks for clarifications. Interesting discussion, good to know. Will need to read up on this (crazy to name it the v-sync again, if that is the case).
  • StingX71
    522 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha, Battlefield V Member
    Dead_Iawn wrote: »
    hey sorry I'm new to pc gaming.. I have a 144hz monitor. I get around 100 frames in game at 1440p. do I even need to worry about gsync as I'm getting lower frames then the monitor? I do have a gsync monitor BTW

    You should be fine.
  • StingX71
    522 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, BF1IncursionsAlpha, Battlefield V Member
    Dragam wrote: »
    OskooI_007 wrote: »
    You will only get tearing if the framerate goes above gsync's refresh rate. The whole point of gsync is to eliminate the need for vsync.

    The only thing enabling vsync in Nvidia control panel does is provide a safety net in case the framerate exceeds gsync's refresh rate.

    To be on the safe side, capping the framerate 4 frames below gsync's refresh rate would pretty much guarantee not a single frame would tear.

    Incorrect.

    Blurbusters guide also specifically states that you should turn vsync on in nvcp, and off on the game.

    https://www.blurbusters.com/gsync/gsync101-input-lag-tests-and-settings/14/


    If you keep your fps within your monitor/gsync's range, vsync will not engage. One could theorize you could keep it off if you keep your fps in check in a game like BF.

    From blurbusters.

    "While NVCP V-SYNC has no input lag reduction over in-game V-SYNC, and when used with G-SYNC + FPS limit, it will never engage, some in-game V-SYNC solutions may introduce their own frame buffer or frame pacing behaviors, enable triple buffer V-SYNC automatically (not optimal for the native double buffer of G-SYNC), or simply not function at all, and, thus, NVCP V-SYNC is the safest bet."
  • Dead_Iawn
    3 postsMember, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, Battlefield V Member
    StingX71 wrote: »
    Dead_Iawn wrote: »
    hey sorry I'm new to pc gaming.. I have a 144hz monitor. I get around 100 frames in game at 1440p. do I even need to worry about gsync as I'm getting lower frames then the monitor? I do have a gsync monitor BTW

    You should be fine.

    yeah thanks... I have it on. It all looks good and smooth to me.. especially coming from an OG xbox to 1440P 100hz
  • Dragam
    688 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    StingX71 wrote: »
    Dragam wrote: »
    OskooI_007 wrote: »
    You will only get tearing if the framerate goes above gsync's refresh rate. The whole point of gsync is to eliminate the need for vsync.

    The only thing enabling vsync in Nvidia control panel does is provide a safety net in case the framerate exceeds gsync's refresh rate.

    To be on the safe side, capping the framerate 4 frames below gsync's refresh rate would pretty much guarantee not a single frame would tear.

    Incorrect.

    Blurbusters guide also specifically states that you should turn vsync on in nvcp, and off on the game.

    https://www.blurbusters.com/gsync/gsync101-input-lag-tests-and-settings/14/


    If you keep your fps within your monitor/gsync's range, vsync will not engage. One could theorize you could keep it off if you keep your fps in check in a game like BF.

    From blurbusters.

    "While NVCP V-SYNC has no input lag reduction over in-game V-SYNC, and when used with G-SYNC + FPS limit, it will never engage, some in-game V-SYNC solutions may introduce their own frame buffer or frame pacing behaviors, enable triple buffer V-SYNC automatically (not optimal for the native double buffer of G-SYNC), or simply not function at all, and, thus, NVCP V-SYNC is the safest bet."

    Issue is (as mentioned above), that frametime variences can cause tearing to appear, if you don't have vsync forced on in nvcp along with gsync. And frametime variences are likely to happen in a game as cpu heavy as this.
  • Dragam
    688 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    I'm a little confused. With a 144hz GSync monitor, assuming I turn V-SYnc off in game, do I still need to limit the frames to 141?

    Yes, you will always need to cap your fps 3 below the hz of your monitor - this is actually the most important part for optimal gsync performance.

    You can either just use rivatuner to limit fps for all your games (which is the easiest solution), or you can use ingame framelimiter in games that support it :)
  • Malzius
    63 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Hardline, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    OskooI_007 wrote: »
    Nope. I'm 100% correct. I edited my post above to add clarity.
    You are indeed 100% correct its pointless to turn vsync on because if you cap your fps it ll never engage anyway, so it ll be off anyway all the time, i play on a 165 hz monitor and honestly above 140 hertz gsync is almost pointless as well because there is barely no tearing
  • afzSnickelfritz
    86 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    nvcp vsync by itself and most runtime limiters do not come close to actually limiting EVERY frame to the cap value; peak fps will typically greatly exceed the cap value, and your CPU will still be processing those frames. AFAIK, only RTSS will absolutely cap the fps at the specified value. And that cap value should be slightly or well below your monitor max refresh rate for gysnc, with nvcp vsync enabled. ie: 144hz = 142fps cap.
    I use 125fps (8ms) as my cap value, and the game runs very smoothly.
  • TapperSweden
    112 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    Malzius wrote: »
    OskooI_007 wrote: »
    Nope. I'm 100% correct. I edited my post above to add clarity.
    You are indeed 100% correct its pointless to turn vsync on because if you cap your fps it ll never engage anyway, so it ll be off anyway all the time, i play on a 165 hz monitor and honestly above 140 hertz gsync is almost pointless as well because there is barely no tearing

    And after all this post you still fail to see that G-sync uses parts of V-sync to work correctly? Even when you are within your monitors refreshrate. No V-sync on in nvcp = no 100% working G-sync.
  • OskooI_007
    25 postsMember, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    So long as the frame rate is capped low enough below Gsyncs refresh rate, Gsync will work correctly. The only thing Vsync does is act as a secondary framerate limiter.
  • CaptHotah
    627 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield Hardline, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    Does dx11 or dx12 change anything??
  • TapperSweden
    112 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, Battlefield V Member
    edited December 7
    OskooI_007 wrote: »
    So long as the frame rate is capped low enough below Gsyncs refresh rate, Gsync will work correctly. The only thing Vsync does is act as a secondary framerate limiter.

    Not correct.
    In early g sync monitors you did not have the option of v-sync OFF. There was just a G-sync ON button in nvcp. The fps was also capped at whatever your monitor was. Later on they released an option to turn V-sync ON or OFF if you wanted to exeed your monitors Hz.
    What they failed to explain is that G-sync and V-sync is tied together, What You did on the early G-sync monitors when turning on G-sync was that you also turned on V-sync (or parts of it). G-sync does not work above your monitors refreshrate, so if you want to use G-sync and have it work properly you need to have v-sync on in nvcp.
    This is from nvidia and you can see if you go to the link that the button they show for exeeding your monitors Hz is V-sync OFF, but that will also disable G-sync no matter if you play at your monitors range or not.

    I Think they dont talk so mutch about this because people Thinks of input lag as soon as v-sync is mentioned, but G-sync needs part of V-sync to work as intended. You can also see in the posts that they tell people to have v-sync ON in nvcp if they want to use G-sync.

    "For enthusiasts, we’ve included a new advanced control option that enables G-SYNC to be disabled when the frame rate of a game exceeds the maximum refresh rate of the G-SYNC monitor. For instance, if your frame rate can reach 250 on a 144Hz monitor, the new option will disable G-SYNC once you exceed 144 frames per second. Doing so will disable G-SYNCs goodness and reintroduce tearing, which G-SYNC eliminates, but it will improve input latency ever so slightly in games that require lighting fast reactions."

    source: https://www.geforce.com/whats-new/articles/g-sync-gets-even-better



    Post edited by TapperSweden on
  • ballFetcher
    73 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, BF1IncursionsAlpha, Battlefield V Member
    @TapperSweden

    1) What is early gsync monitors in this case (a time-frame would be nice)? When (approximately) did this On/Off behavior change?

    2) Implicit this statement seem to indicate that with older monitors, when enabling gsync and setting vsync to off, you also turned off gsync completely? Or did/do Nvidia automatically handle this conflict in drivers for us? If they handle that stuff this extra step is a non-issue.

    3) E.g, as I have vsync off in global settings and gsync on - does this mean some part of vsync is still ON or does it mean the setting are in conflict/not used as intended?

    4) "For enthusiasts, we’ve included a new advanced control option that enables G-SYNC to be disabled when the frame rate of a game exceeds the maximum refresh rate of the G-SYNC monitor. For instance, if your frame rate can reach 250 on a 144Hz monitor, the new option will disable G-SYNC once you exceed 144 frames per second. Doing so will disable G-SYNCs goodness and reintroduce tearing, which G-SYNC eliminates, but it will improve input latency ever so slightly in games that require lighting fast reactions

    This seem to say what most posters say, keep below (Gsync) Monitor refresh rate and you and gsync works well. I.e., it confirms the statement by OskooI_007. It is also what i perceived was correct before this discussion. I cant seem to find a new advanced option for this (unless it is several years old). Both gsync and vsync still exist in global settings.

    5) "Doing so will disable G-SYNCs goodness" - perhaps not the correct source to rely on?

    Cheers
  • Aircool_212
    557 postsMember, Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Battlefield, Battlefield 1, CTE, Battlefield V Member
    This is a funny thread because there's lots of different 'facts' being bandied about. I actually posted on the Nvidia forums for official advice on v-sync setting when using a gsync monitor.

    Nil heard!

    So I still don't know what's the correct options. Personally, I leave it on NCP default and don't touch vsync in game either. If the game has a frame limiter, I'll use it but set it to my monitors refresh rate. I should probably leave it uncapped and either bump up my refresh rate to 180Hz or... well... I dunno, there's just so much conflicting advice.

    What I do know is that originally, gsync had vsync ON because people later asked for the option to turn off vsync when using gsync for whatever reason.

    These days, I just don't have a clue, and I won't trust any advice unless it comes from the horses mouth.
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